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Conferences, Calls for Papers and Scholarships


CONFERENCES

The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University is excited to announce the 10th Annual DePauw Undergraduate Ethics Symposium. The Undergraduate Ethics Symposium will take place from April 6-8, 2017, on the theme of “The Intersecting Worlds of Researchers, Executives and Journalists.”

We welcome submissions from undergraduate creative writers, artists and filmmakers as well as scholars, as we believe the arts are an essential component to the exploration of ethics in society. Scholars should submit a paper on a topic of ethical inquiry or exploration. Writers, artists and filmmakers may submit a short story, series of poems, short play, short screenplay or short film in which an ethical topic and/or dilemma is central.

Keynote speakers include:

James Hamblin, MD, senior editor at The Atlantic

Jennifer E. Miller, PhD, assistant professor at NYU School of Medicine and founding president of Bioethics International

Helen Phillips, MFA, novelist and assistant professor at Brooklyn College

Anna Sale, host and managing editor of NPR’s Death, Sex and Money

The symposium is held at DePauw University’s Prindle Institute for Ethics, located in a 500 acre nature park. Participating undergraduate students attend seminars with visiting scholars and artists and also hear presentations on the symposium’s theme. Students who are accepted to the symposium will receive free lodging and meals. Need-based assistance is available for travel. Submissions in all areas of ethical inquiry are encouraged and will be accepted using our online submission form below until February 1, 2017.


UM-FLINT 5TH UNDERGRADUATE PHILOSOPHY CONFERENCE

As we near the end of the semester, please pass word on to your undergraduate students who have worked on papers on topics relevant to the upcoming 5th annual Michigan Undergraduate Philosophy Conference, which will be held in February. Students who present a talk at this conference have the opportunity to submit a final version of their paper for publication in our student managed undergraduate philosophy journal compos mentis. For those students who are too far away or otherwise unable to join us for the conference in February, please encourage them to consider submitting a paper to the open issue of compos mentis. Information concerning both the conference and the call for papers for the open issue of compos mentis are attached.

If any students have any questions, please have them contact the student editor, Cody Hatfield-Myers, comyers@umflint.edu.

Jami Anderson
Philosophy Department
UM-Flint
Center for Cognition and Neuroethics


The Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium
Undergraduate Philosophy Conference 2017
presented by the Drexel University Department of English & Philosophy and College of Arts and Sciences

The Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium’s annual Undergraduate Philosophy Conference will be held Saturday, March 4, 2017, 9:00am to 5:00pm at Drexel University’s University City campus, Philadelphia PA, 19104. Undergraduates are invited to submit philosophical essays suitable for a fifteen to twenty minute presentation on any topic, to be followed by commentary and discussion. Papers must not exceed 2,500 words or 10 pages, double-spaced, and must be prepared for blind review. One submission per person. The top eight submissions will be read by their authors at the conference and published in Fresh Philosophy, the undergraduate philosophy blog/journal of the GPPC Reviewers will include Philosophy faculty and undergraduate Philosophy majors including the journal editors.

The deadline for submissions is Sunday, December 18, 2016. Please send your submission by email attachment as an electronic file in .doc or .rtf format to Peter Amato at peterama@drexel.edu. Notification of accepted papers will be sent by Saturday, February 4, 2017. Commentators will be needed to present brief remarks following each paper. If you are interested in being a commentator, whether or not you intend to submit a paper, let us know. For further information write to peterama@drexel.edu or check the conference website http://www.pages.drexel.edu/~pa34/gppcupc2017.pdf


Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
Saturday, April 8, 2017

Inspired by evolving definitions of the humanities, the Duquesne University English Graduate Conference seeks papers from graduate and upper-level undergraduate students on fluidity in identity, discipline, and media. How does the rise of the digital humanities and interdisciplinarity create new frameworks for defining, explaining, and challenging traditional conceptions of discipline, text, and methodologies? How does fluidity between binarisms in media, identity, and discipline enrich scholarship? We invite submissions for panels, papers, posters, and other media presentations that explore exchange across demarcations in all periods and disciplines and embody academic fluidity.

Possible topics for presentation include, but are not limited to:

  • Intermediality & Multimodality (i.e. intersections of popular culture and media, music/film/visual art in literature, adaptation)
  • Intertextuality & Interdisciplinarity (i.e. medicine, science, phenomenology, musicology, philosophy, psychology, education, journalism, law, history, religion, social justice)
  • Pedagogy, Theories of Reading and Writing
  • Growth and Circulation of Print and Digital Culture; Digital Humanities
  • Intersubjectivity & Performance (i.e. fluidity in race, gender, sexuality, ability, etc.)
  • Movement & Mobility
  • Ethics & Affect

Keynote Address

T. Austin Graham is an Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and the author of The Great American Songbooks (Oxford University Press, 2013). His work on literature’s relationship to other arts and disciplines appears in ELH, American Literature, American Literary History,New Literary History, and other venues.
Presentation Modes & Abstract Due Dates

  • Paper presentation: We welcome individual papers no longer than 20 minutes. Please send a 250-300 word abstract of your paper toenglishgo@duq.edu by January 15, 2017.
  • Panel presentation: We welcome pre-made panels of three presenters. Proposals should include a title, rationale for the panel, and individual paper abstracts (250-300 words each). Panels should be no longer than 60 minutes to allow time for a question and answer period. Please send all of this information to englishgo@duq.edu by midnight on January 15, 2017.
  • Poster presentation: We welcome poster presentations for display during the day of the conference. Posters should be no larger than 36″ by 48″. Presenters may either elect to use a corkboard or a table. Please send a 250-300 word abstract of your research to englishgo@duq.edu by midnighton January 15, 2017.
  • Digital presentation: We welcome digital presentations (blog, vlog, website, digital humanities project, etc.) for display. Please note that you must provide your own computer. Please send a 250-300 word abstract of your research and specify if you have any other AV needs by midnight toenglishgo@duq.edu on January 15, 2017.

If you have any questions prior to submitting your proposal, please contact conference co-directors, Marla Anzalone and Carol Fox at englishgo@duq.edu.

For further information on Duquesne University’s English Graduate Organization, please visit our website.

Check out our CFP on UPenn & H-Net.


The 3rd Annual National Undergraduate Philosophy Conference at WVU April 1st. 2017

Call for  Papers
Keynote Speaker:
Scott Soames
University of Southern California

Submission Deadline: February 11th. 2017

$100 Cash Prize for best paper Papers can be on any philosophy topic No More than 3,000 words. Submit for blind review, i.e. no name, or institution name

Must have a works cited page Submit document as a .docx or pdf to: PhilosophyWVU@gmail.com. Questions, comments or concerns should be directed to:
Curtis Kesner
President of WVU Philosophy Club ckesner4@mix.wvu.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS

February 24-25, 2017

University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Wilmington, North Carolina
Keynote Speaker: Keya Maitra
Professor of Philosophy, UNC Asheville

Submitted Papers: Papers on any philosophical topic are welcome.  Due to the volume of submissions, submitted papers must be no longer than 3000 words.  The deadline to receive papers is Friday, December 30th. Authors of accepted papers will be notified in mid-to-late January.

All submissions should be formatted for blind review and sent to Matthew Brophy, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and NCPS Secretary-Treasurer, at mbrophy@highpoint.edu

In the body of your email, please indicate your name, email address, phone number, and institutional affiliation (if any). If you wish your paper to be considered for a prize (see below), please note whether you are an untenured faculty member, graduate student, or an undergraduate student.

Location: All sessions will be on the campus of UNC Wilmington. Wilmington is a port city in coastal southeastern North Carolina. The Wilmington International Airport (ILM) serves the area with commercial air service provided by American Airlines and Delta Air Lines.

Panels and Workshops: Panel and workshop proposals on any topic in philosophy, including eastern philosophy, feminist approaches, pedagogy, and more, are welcome. Proposals should specify issues to be discussed, format (including time to be allotted), names of presenters, and brief abstracts.

Undergraduate Papers: A sufficient number of undergraduate submissions will allow for a session devoted to papers by undergraduates. Undergraduate submissions should be clearly labeled as such.

Prizes: There will be a $200 prize for the best paper submitted by an untenured faculty member, a $150 prize for the best graduate student paper, and a $125 prize for the best undergraduate paper. Awarding of prizes is contingent on an adequate number of submissions.

Web site: Periodic updates about the conference, including conference hotel rates, and information about the North Carolina Philosophical Society, can be found at http://www.northcarolinaphilosophicalsociety.org/


11th Annual Southeast Graduate Philosophy Conference (SEGPC) 2017 Friday, March 17th – Saturday, March 18th, 2017

Keynote Speaker: Professor Kendall Walton

University of Michigan

The Southeast Graduate Philosophy Conference is a national conference held annually since 2006 at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. Each conference has an invited keynote speaker as well as a capstone speaker drawn from the faculty at UF. Our capstone speaker is to be announced. Each paper accepted for presentation will be assigned a commentator. The conference is thus a great opportunity for graduate students to present their work and receive critical feedback in a professional venue. Please forward this email announcement to graduate students and anyone who may be interested in attending.

The deadline for submissions is Wednesday, January 6th, 2017.

Submission Guidelines:
Papers of high quality in any area of philosophy are welcome. Submissions should adhere to the

following guidelines:

(1) Submissions should be sent via email to kshodge@ufl.edu. Please include “SEGPC SUBMIT” in subject of the email.
(2) The body of the email should contain the following information:

– Author’s name

– Title of the paper

– Institutional affiliation

– Contact information (email, phone number, mailing address, etc.)

– The word count of the paper

– The area of the paper (e.g., philosophy of mind, ethical theory, etc.)

(3) Submissions should be attached in .docx, .pdf, or .rtf should be a paper of no more than 4,500 words preceded by an abstract of no more than 200 words.
(4) Papers should be prepared for anonymous review. Please omit any self-identifying information anywhere in your attached paper.

For more information and updates, visit the conference home page at:

http://www.phil.ufl.edu/events/2017/03/seg

Please pass along the word to graduate students in your department. Any questions about the conference, as well as submissions, may be sent to kshodge@ufl.edu.


Episteme will consider papers written by undergraduate students in any area of philosophy. Papers are evaluated according to the following criteria: quality of research, depth of philosophic inquiry, creativity, original insight and clarity. Submissions to be considered for the twenty-eighth volume (May 2017) should
adhere to the following stipulations:
1. Be a maximum of 5,000 words, a minimum of 2,000 words.
2. Combine research and original insight.
3. Include a cover sheet that provides the following information:
author’s name, mailing address (current and permanent), email
address, telephone number, college or university name, title of
submission and word count.
4. Include a works cited page in the Chicago Manual of Style format.
Please use endnotes rather than footnotes.
5. To allow for a blind review process, the author’s name should
not appear on the submission itself.
6. Submissions should be sent electronically, formatted for Microsoft Word.
7. More than one article per author will not be accepted for review.
8. Please be courteous; submit each paper to only one journal.
Rolling submissions accepted. Submissions to be considered for May 2017 publication must be received by midnight, Sunday, December 18, 2016. Please send papers and cover sheets to episteme@denison.edu.
Questions should be submitted to the Editors (episteme@denison.edu)


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Deadline for submission: March 31, 2017 

This is an open call for papers; nonetheless papers submitted should be relevant to cognition and neuroethics broadly understood. Topics can include any of the following, although this is not an exhaustive list:

  • Philosophy of Mind
  • Philosophy of Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, or general Science
  • Philosophy of Action (Free Will)
  • Identity
  • Philosophy of Psychology
  • Bioethics, Medical Ethics or Neuroethics
  • Consciousness
  • Mental Phenomena

Here are just a few of the sorts of questions and ideas that we encourage students to write about:

What is self-identity?  Can you freely alter your own self-identity?   Are there aspects of one’s personal-identity that it would be wrong to alter, eliminate or hide?  If so, why?  What is the proper way to conceptualize pain and suffering?  Is all pain bad?  How do other cultures, presently or historically, conceptualize the mind, belief, knowledge, pain?  How do other cultures conceive of medicine, health and physical and emotional well-being?  What is the proper role of medicine—to eliminate or cure illness or to enhance people (physically, morally, psychologically) to make them “better than well”?  Should all illnesses or diseases be cured—why or why not?  What are the limits (if any) of parental control over the health and well-being of the body and mind of their child?  Do children have the right to determine whether or not they are subjected to medical or psychological treatments?  Are there ever occasions when it is permissible (mandatory?) for third parties to make therapeutic decisions for someone?  What are the social consequences of being regarded as diseased or ill?  How are health, life and death, medicine, physical and mental illness portrayed in art, music, and in literature?

We ask that abstracts be limited to 400 words.  The talk presented at the conference should be approximately 20 minutes.  Each talk will have 15 minutes or so for discussion. Submit abstracts by email as a Word .doc or .docx file prepared for blind review including your full contact information in the email only. The purpose of this conference is to support and encourage the intellectual work of undergraduates, so all abstracts submitted should be the work of undergraduate students.

All submissions should be sent to the student editor, Cody Hatfield-Myers: hatfield-myers@cognethic.org

Papers accepted will be published in Issue 5, volume 2 of Compos Mentis: The Undergraduate Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics. For previous compos mentis publications, and publication formatting information, please see http://cognethic.org/composmentis

To support the intellectual work of undergraduates, compos mentis does not charge authors publications fees.  All publications of compos mentis are free and open to the public.  Editorial policies and content decisions for the Compos Mentis: Undergraduate Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics progress by collaboration between the University of Michigan-Flint Philosophy Club, select faculty from the University of Michigan-Flint Philosophy Department, and under the advice from the Center for Cognition and Neuroethics.

The Center for Cognition and Neuroethics promotes both the exploration of the conceptual foundations of the neurosciences and the study of the implications of their advances for society in the legal, political, and ethical realms. The CCN will disseminate this knowledge to as wide an audience as possible through publication, seminars and other media. We engage in activities across multiple disciplines and professions that allow opportunities for intellectual synergy and increased impact by creating, fostering and supporting research and educational collaborations and communication.

For more information about the Center for Cognition and Neuroethics or compos mentis, please see http://www.cognethic.org or email faculty advisor Jami L. Anderson, jamia@umflint.edu


5th Annual Michigan Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Flint, MI

February 17, 2017

Call for ABSTRACTS

The deadline for abstract submission is 23 December 2016.

Theme: Cognition and Neuroethics

This theme should be very broadly understood, and is intended to include any of the following:

Philosophy of Mind

  • Philosophy of Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, or general Science
  • Philosophy of Action (Free Will)
  • Identity
  • Philosophy of Psychology
  • Bioethics
  • Medical Ethics
  • Consciousness
  • Pain and Suffering
  • Memory, Learning, Belief and Knowledge
  • Moral and Ethical Responsibility
  • Learning

Here are just a few of the sorts of questions and ideas that we encourage students to write about:

What is self-identity?  Can you freely alter your own self-identity?   Are there aspects of one’s personal-identity that it would be wrong to alter, eliminate or hide?  If so, why?  What is the proper way to conceptualize pain and suffering?  Is all pain bad?  How do other cultures, presently or historically, conceptualize the mind, belief, knowledge, pain?  How do other cultures conceive of medicine, health and physical and emotional well-being?  What is the proper role of medicine—to eliminate or cure illness or to enhance people (physically, morally, psychologically) to make them “better than well”?  Should all illnesses or diseases be cured—why or why not?  What are the limits (if any) of parental control over the health and well-being of the body and mind of their child?  Do children have the right to determine whether or not they are subjected to medical or psychological treatments?  Are there ever occasions when it is permissible (mandatory?) for third parties to make therapeutic decisions for someone?  What are the social consequences of being regarded as diseased or ill?  How are health, life and death, medicine, physical and mental illness portrayed in art, music, and in literature?

We ask that abstracts be between 300 and 400 words.  The talk presented at the conference should have a reading time of no more than minutes.  Each talk will be followed by at least 15 minutes of discussion. Submit abstracts by email as a Word .doc or .docx file prepared for blind review, including your full contact information in the email only. The purpose of this conference is to support and encourage the intellectual work of undergraduates, so all abstracts submitted should be the work of undergraduate students.

All submissions should be sent to the student editor, Cody Hatfield-Myers: hatfield-myers@cognethic.org

Volume 5 Issue 1 of compos mentis: The Undergraduate Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics will be devoted to talks presented at the 2016 Michigan Undergraduate Philosophy Conference that have been revised into polished papers. All talks presented at the conference are eligible for submission and review.  To support the intellectual work of undergraduates, compos mentis does not charge authors publications fees.  Accessing all compos mentis publications is free and open to the public.  For submission formatting requirements, please see the Style Guide on the C.M. web page: http://cognethic.org/composmentis

The annual Michigan Undergraduate Philosophy Conference is organized by the University of Michigan-Flint Philosophy Club with the guidance of the Center for Cognition and Neuroethics, and is sponsored by the University of Michigan-Flint Philosophy Department.

The Center for Cognition and Neuroethics promotes both the exploration of the conceptual foundations of the neurosciences and the study of the implications of their advances for society in the legal, political, and ethical realms.  The CCN will disseminate this knowledge to as wide an audience as possible through publication, conferences and seminars. We support activities and events involving multiple disciplines and professions that allow opportunities for intellectual synergy and increased impact by creating, fostering and supporting research and educational collaborations and communication, both at the student and professional level.
For additional information about the Center for Cognition and Neuroethics or compos mentis, please see http://www.cognethic.org or email faculty advisor Professor Jami L. Anderson.


Prometheus is a national undergraduate philosophy journal published by undergraduate students at Johns Hopkins University. The purpose of the journal is to promote philosophic discourse of the highest standard by offering students an opportunity to engage in open discussion, participate in the production and publication of an academic journal, and establish a community of aspiring philosophers. Each year, Prometheus publishes quality undergraduate papers in philosophy. Each issue contains a selection of essays on various philosophic topics. Prometheus is distributed throughout Homewood Campus and philosophy departments across the nation. Printed issues of Prometheus are also available online. Prometheus accepts submissions through January 25th, 2017, with decisions to be expected by mid-spring, and publication occurring the following summer.Individuals may submit multiple pieces to Prometheus, and are welcome to submit those pieces to other publications. However, individuals may only accept publication at one journal. Please inform Prometheus as soon as your paper has been accepted elsewhere.

Please make sure to follow all of the directions stated here if you are interested in submitting one of your philosophy papers to Prometheus.

Deadline: Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

Book Review & Interview Submissions

If you are interested in writing a review on an article, book, or essay, or conduct and write an interview for Prometheus, please email us at editors@prometheus-journal.com with a proposed book (must be published within the last twelve months) or interviewee. Editors have full discretion in the final publication of book reviews and interviews.

Essay Submission

Prometheus accepts undergraduate papers on all philosophical topics. Essays written for classes, honors theses, and independent work are welcome. Multiple submissions are allowed, but you may only accept publication at one journal.

Please make sure to read and follow all the submission requirements. We cannot guarantee your paper will be read if you fail to follow all the requirements:

1. You must be an undergraduate or a graduating senior.

2. You may submit multiple pieces to Prometheus, and you are welcome to submit those pieces to other publications.

3. Submissions should be 10-30 double-spaced pages in MLA format with proper citations. Essays must be the original work of the author. If your essay is shorter than 10 pages and you still wish to submit your essay, email one of the editor-in-chiefs for further information.

4. Submit an electronic copy of your essay to editors@prometheus-journal.com in either .doc or .docx format.

  If your paper relies on figures, images, or any similar media, please send all such files as their own attachments, not simply embedded in the document.

5. Please attach a cover page in a SEPARATE DOCUMENT with the following information:

a. Name

b. University or College

c. Major or Degree

d. Year of Expected Graduation

e. Email

f. Phone Number

g. Address

DO NOT INCLUDE ANY PERSONAL INFORMATION ON THE PAPER ITSELF. Please include a short (100-200 words) abstract at the beginning of your paper.

For any other inquiries about submission or the publication status of your essay, please email us at editors@prometheus-journal.com.

http://prometheus-journal.com


 CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal is produced and edited entirely by undergraduate students. We aim to enrich student learning by providing an opportunity for undergraduate students to have their original scholarly work reviewed by or published in a peer-reviewed academic journal.

Episteme is a student-run journal that aims to recognize and encourage excellence in undergraduate philosophy by providing examples of some of the best work currently being done in undergraduate philosophy programs. Episteme is published under the auspices of Denison University’s Department of Philosophy. We publish a journal in print each Spring. We are proud to announce the twenty-seventh volume of Episteme, which you can download from Episteme’s website. Specially requested print editions have been shipped. This year’s submissions spanned a diverse body of philosophical literature from philosophy of feminism to Kripke’s philosophy of language, and they included authors as far-flung from as the Kyoto University. We hope that an even broader host of students are encouraged to participate in the next volume.

Discussions is an undergraduate run, peer-reviewed research journal that publishes undergraduate research in all fields of study. Discussions publishes several times every year.

Lex Modestum is a student run undergraduate philosophy journal dedicated to providing opportunities to aspiring philosophers. We accept original philosophical works from undergraduate students in both Analytic and Continental strains of thought. Along with the traditional essay format, we are also interested in presenting unique philosophical ideas via original modes of presentation (e.g. dialogues, poems, artwork, and short stories).

Page last modified: December 7, 2016